Friday, January 30, 2015

Masters in Sustainability at Hofstra

One of the goals I had when I moved from the University of South Florida to Hofstra University (officially one of the most underrated universities in the nation) was to build a Masters in Sustainability. After quite a bit of work by many of us at Hofstra, we are now accepting applications.  To find out more about the program and apply, click here.

We built this program with maximum flexibility for students so that they could work with one of 30 mentors in designing a degree program that makes sense for their professional goals. Hofstra is well known for having some of the best faculty in the nation who work closely with students on real-world issues.  As a small campus, we often work with students individually or as teams on a number of research issues.  Faculty who will serve as mentors for our graduate students come from the natural sciences, humanities, social sciences, health sciences, law, business, and health.

Our close proximity to New York, gives us great access to major institutions (like the United Nations), leading businesses and non-profits, and leaders in the sustainability world.  At the same time, our suburban and rural setting with extensive coastal and agricultural resources provides an interesting juxtaposition that allows us to explore a full range of sustainability issues.

We also have funding for students.  We have wonderful support for our graduate program through the National Center for Suburban Studies and through Hofstra's College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.  Even without support, our private university graduate tuition is comparable to the graduate tuition seen at must public universities.

Perhaps the best thing about Hofstra is the community of scholars we have on campus.  We attract some of the best students in the nation to work with some of the most talented faculty in the nation.  We pride ourselves on small classes and quality student and faculty engagement.

We hope that our students, upon completing their masters, will help to make improvements in the sustainability of the New York region, our nation, or the world through their efforts.

As a geologist, I can affirm that we are entering a period of time known as the Anthropocene.  This is a new era of extinctions and widespread environmental and geologic change.  We have many difficult decades ahead of us as we work to adapt to this changing world.  There will be a great need for experts in areas of sustainability.  Come join us and be part of the team working to make the world a better place.

For more information, please contact me at robert.brinkmann@hofstra.edu

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